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Marijuana Pepsi Jackson

First there was Tula Does The Hula From Hawaii.  Then there was Weather’By Dot Com Chanel Fourcast.  Now I would like to introduce you to Marijuana Pepsi Jackson.  The story from the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (via Freakonomics Blog).

I know, I know. We already looked at absurd names and the legal cases they inspire but I have to circle back to the subject after running across this tidbit on the wonderful Volokh Conspiracy website.

Here is a legal exchange between a judge and a parent wherein the parent defends and explains their decision to name their child “Weather’by Dot Com Chanel Fourcast Sheppard”. One parent was suing for custody to change the child’s name to Samuel Charles Speir.

From The Volokh Conspiracy:

The Court: I simply do not understand why you named this child — his legal name is Weather’by Dot Com Chanel Fourcast Sheppard. Now, before you answer that, Mr. — the plaintiff in this action is a weatherman for a local television station.

Sheppard: Yes.

The Court: Okay. Is that why you named this child the name that you gave the child?

Sheppard: It — it stems from a lot of things.

The Court: Okay. Tell me what they are.

Sheppard: Weather’by — I’ve always heard of Weatherby as a last name and never a first name, so I thought Weatherby would be — and I’m sure you could spell it b-e-e or b-e-a or b-y. Anyway, Weatherby.

The Court: Where did you get the “Dot Com”?

Sheppard: Well, when I worked at NBC, I worked on a Teleprompter computer.

The Court: All right.

Sheppard: All right, and so that’s where the Dot Com [came from]. I just thought it was kind of cute, Dot Com, and then instead of — I really didn’t have a whole lot of names because I had nothing to work with. I don’t know family names. I don’t know any names of the Speir family, and I really had nothing to work with, and I thought “Chanel”? No, that’s stupid, and I thought “Shanel,” I’ve heard of a black little girl named Shanel.

The Court: Well, where did you get “Fourcast”?

Sheppard: Fourcast? Instead of F-o-r-e, like your future forecast or your weather forecast, F-o-u, as in my fourth son, my fourth child, Fourcast. It was —

The Court: So his name is Fourcast, F-o-u-r-c-a-s-t?

Sheppard: Yes….

The Court: All right. Now, do you have some objection to him being renamed Samuel Charles?

Sheppard: Yes.

The Court: Why? You think it’s better for his name to be Weather’by Dot Com Chanel … Fourcast, spelled F-o-u-r-c-a-s-t? And in response to that question, I want you to think about what he’s going to be — what his life is going to be like when he enters the first grade and has to fill out all [the] paperwork where you fill out — this little kid fills out his last name and his first name and his middle name, okay? So I just want — if your answer to that is yes, you think his name is better today than it would be with Samuel Charles, as his father would like to name him and why. Go ahead.

Sheppard: Yes, I think it’s better this way.

The Court: The way he is now?

Sheppard: Yes. He doesn’t have to use “Dot Com.” I mean, as a grown man, he can use whatever he wants.

The Court: As a grown man, what is his middle name? Dot Com Chanel Fourcast?

Sheppard: He can use Chanel, he can use the letter “C.” …

The court of appeals finished with, “we hold that the trial court did not err in determining that it was in the child’s best interest to change his name.”